A LOOK AT THE ROLE OF DRUG COMPANIES BY THE BBC AS PART OF THEIR SPECIAL REPORT ON AIDS. " SAFEGUARDING THE FUTURE " ...

” Apartheid of Pharmacology “ shows that it isn’t just AIDS drugs and treatment that have faced industrial pressure. Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting have a great piece criticizing an ABC July 8 1999 show on the topic as they suggest that the show was more of a “brief for the drug industry” and that it didn’t even interview many experts on the issue. As the WHO Commission on Macroeconomics and Health recently concluded, health is more than an outcome of development, it is a crucial means to achieving development.

The free market fundamentalism of the World Bank and IMF has had a disastrous impact on Africa’s health. As health care has become an expensive privilege, the poor have been unable to pay for essential services. The privatization of health care in Africa has created a two-tier system which reinforces economic and social inequalities.

Successfully responding to the spread of HIV/AIDS and other diseases in Africa requires strong public health care services. Private health care cannot make the necessary interventions at the community level. Beyond the issue of affordability, private health care is also inappropriate in responding to Africa’s particular health needs.

The outcome has been the denial of access to the poor, who cannot afford to pay for private care…. For example.. user fees have actually succeeded in driving the poor away from health care while the promotion of insurance schemes as a means to defray the costs of private health care.. is inherently flawed in the African context. The World Bank has recommended several forms of privatization in the health sector…. Throughout Africa, the privatization of health care has reduced access to necessary services. The privatization of basic health care has further impeded the response to the health crisis….

Efforts to address the health crisis have been undermined by the lack of available resources and the breakdown in health care delivery systems. The erosion of Africa’s health care infrastructure has left many countries unable to cope with the impact of HIV/AIDS and other diseases. It was estimated in 1997 that sub-Saharan African governments were transferring to Northern creditors four times what they were spending on the health of their people.

Health care services in African countries disintegrated, while desperately needed resources were siphoned off by foreign creditors. By the 1990s, most African countries were spending more repaying foreign debts than on health or education for their people. It also illustrated a commitment by African leaders to the principle of building and developing their health care systems.

The Declaration of Alma Ata focused on a community-based approach to health care and resolved that comprehensive health care was a basic right and a responsibility of government. The World Health Organization (WHO) emphasized the importance of primary healthcare at the historic Alma Ata Conference in 1978.
https://www.centerwatch.com/drug-information/fda-approved-drugs/
http://mydiscountpills.com
http://home.mmc.edu/
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/all-about-sex/201406/the-most-popular-erection-drug-is-not-viagra
https://www.acphs.edu/